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Old Lime Kiln (above and below)

Text from sign outside Kiln

The Making of Lime

When taking a walk down to the Creek just after leaving Stoke Gabriel road you will see this well preserved example of a lime kiln.  Limestone was once burnt with coal in the kiln to form quicklime which was spread on the fields by farmers to counteract the acidity of the local soil. It was also used in lime mortar for building and in lime wash for whitening cottage walls.

The limestone came from the quarry behind the kiln and the fuel was brought from South Wales by small sailing vessels.  Behind the front you can see there was a circular lime firing pot about 6 feet in diameter and 12 feet deep.  This would have been filled with alternate layers of stone and coal.  Then kindling of furze or twigs would be laid at the bottom of the pit and lit through a grate hole. The burnt lime was then raked out through the grate (from the floor level under the arch) by a lime burner employed to supervise the whole process.

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